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Doughty

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                     *  WORD A DAY  *
                  Thursday, July 26, 2007
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Fellow Logophiles, 

Good morning! Here are the answers to the word scramble: 
1) abeyance, 2) fetor, 3) benison, 4) panoptic, and 
5) maquillage. 

I'd like to share with you the origin of the phrase "eating 
humble pie," which means to be proven wrong, usually after 
boasting. 

Humble pie is a derivation of umble pie and refers to the 
intestines of an animal especially when used for food. The 
original umbles were the innards of the deer: the liver, 
heart, entrails and other second-class bits. 

It was common practice in medieval times to serve a pie 
made of these parts of the animal to the servants and others 
that would be sitting at the lower tables in the lord's 
hall. To eat humble pie is to accept your position at the 
lower table. 

Sincerely,

Carly

P.S. You can discuss this issue or any other topic in the
new Word A Day forum. Check it out here... Word A Day Forum

                             *

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                             *


WORD:  doughty   DOW-tee  (adjective)

: Marked by fearless resolution 

SYNONYMS: * valiant 
          * brave 
          * bold 

WORD WISE: Doughty comes from Old English dohtig, "brave, 
valiant, fit." 

QUOTE: He was obsessed with the Arctic, his imagination sto-
ked by epic accounts of the doughty pioneers who had led 
wooden ships into uncharted waters and northern mists. 
--Sara Wheeler, "In Cold Blood?" New York Times, February 25, 
2001 


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                             *


BONUS WORD OF THE DAY:  protuberate   pro toobe rayt 
(intransitive verb)

: To swell out from surroundings 

From Latin protuberat-, past participle stem of protuberare, 
literally "to swell forward." 



                  OBSCURE AND UNUSUAL WORDS
                  *************************

1)  sauve qui peut   soov kee poo  (noun) 
    : a disordered or panicked escape 

    Early 19th century. From French, literally "save who 
    can." 

2)  gloze   glooz  (transitive verb) 
    : to attempt to underplay or minimize something 
    unpleasant or embarrassing 

    Thirteenth century. Via French glose from, ultimately, 
    Latin glossa "obscure word." 


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