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NASA offers to take names to the moon

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Gizmorama - NASA offers to take names to the moon
"The Cutting Edge of Science Fact and Science Possibilities"
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Good Morning,
Thanks to everyone who wrote in yesterday about powering off
your PC. On Monday, I will post reader comments as well as
try and get some additional information on what is best. One 
of our articles today is about sending your name to the moon, 
check it out! 

Have a great weekend!
Erin

Questions? Comments? Email me at: mailto:gizmo@gophercentral.com 
Email your comments 

P.S. You can discuss this issue or any other topic in the new 
Gizmorama forum. Check it out here...
http://archives.gophercentral.com/forum/forums/forum-view.asp?fid=23

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	  Increasingly intense storms threaten coral

A British scientist suggests hurricanes and other storms are 
increasing in intensity and are limiting the growth of some 
corals. The Earthwatch Institute-supported study focused on 
the ability of corals in Belize to "recruit" new coral into 
their communities. "Increasing evidence now shows that storms 
are becoming more intense due to climate change," said lead 
author and Earthwatch scientist James Crabbe from the University 
of Bedfordshire. Coral reefs, which can expand for thousands 
of years, form when free-swimming coral larvae in the ocean 
attach to rocks or other hard surfaces and begin to develop.
"If the storms don't destroy corals outright, they render them 
more susceptible to disease," said Crabbe, "and that is certainly 
apparent on the Belize reefs." He said his findings have 
implications for marine park managers. "They may need to assist 
coral recruitment and settlement (during hurricane years) by 
establishing coral nurseries and then placing the baby corals 
(larvae) in the reef at discrete locations" or by setting up 
artificial reef blocks to help the corals survive. The research 
that included Edwin Martinez, Earthwatch field director in 
Belize, appears in the May issue of the journal Marine 
Environmental Research.

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	  Study finds how bacteria fight antibiotics

U.S. scientists say they've discovered how some bacteria 
survive antibiotic treatment -- they turn on resistance 
mechanisms when exposed to the drugs. "When patients are treated 
with antibiotics some pathogenic microbes can turn on the genes 
that protect them from the action of the drug," said University 
of Illinois Professor Alexander Mankin, associate director of 
the school's Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and the 
study's principal investigator. "We studied how bacteria can 
feel the presence of erythromycin and activate production of 
the resistance genes." Erythromycin and other macrolide 
antibiotics act upon the ribosomes -- the protein-synthesizing 
factories of the cell, the researchers said. A newly made protein 
exits the ribosome through a tunnel spanning the ribosome body. 
Antibiotics can ward off an infection by attaching to the 
ribosome and preventing proteins the bacterium needs from 
moving through the tunnel, they said. But the study reveals 
some bacteria have learned how to sense the presence of the 
antibiotic in the ribosomal tunnel, and in response switch 
on genes that make them resistant to the drug, Mankin said.
The study that included Assistant Professor Nora Vazquez-
Laslop and undergraduate student Celine Thum appears in the 
April 24 issue of the journal Molecular Cell.

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	   NASA offers to take names to the moon

The U.S. space agency has started a project that provides an
opportunity for people to send their names to the moon.
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration said the 
names will be placed in orbit around the moon for years to 
come aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft.
Participants can submit their information at 
http://lro.jhuapl.edu/NameToMoon/, print a certificate and 
have their name entered into a database. The database will be 
placed on a microchip that will be integrated onto the spacecraft.
The orbiter will provide the most comprehensive data set ever 
returned from the moon, focusing on identifying safe landing 
sites and lunar resources. It also will study how lunar radiation 
might affect humans. "Everyone who sends their name to the moon, 
like I'm doing, becomes part of the next wave of lunar 
explorers," said Cathy Peddie, deputy project manager for LRO 
at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "The LRO 
mission is the first step in NASA's plans to return humans to 
the moon by 2020, and your name can reach there first. How 
cool is that?" The deadline for submitting names is June 27.

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