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       Classic Laff-a-Day - July 31, 2008
                    Laffaday.com 
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Greetings Laff Lovers,

I played 18 with my nephew the other day and he's gotten quite
good. His natural shot is a draw, and his swing is smooth and
not rushed. On one of the par 3's his ball landed in the
bunker. I stood behind him and watched as he aligned himself,
dug in his feet, grounded his club and swung to within 8 feet
of the hole.

"That's a two stroke penalty," I said.

"What is?" he asked.

"Grounding your club in a bunker or hazard."

"Really?"

I was genuinely surprised that someone that shoots in the 90's
wouldn't know such a simple rule. So I'm dedicating the next
couple of issues to the Rules of Golf. I found this quiz in
Golf Magazine. Do yourself a favor and take the test to see
how well you really know the game.

TZ 

mailto:tz@laffaday.com 

Send me your comments and jokes: 
Submit a Comment 



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This test is from Golf Magazine


QUESTION 1 (of 5)
Your tee shot comes to rest on a paved cart path. You decide
to take a drop and determine that your nearest point of relief
from the cart path is next to the path in casual water, the
result of recent rain storms.

How should you proceed?

a. Play the ball as it lies
b. Take a penalty stroke and return to the tee box
c. Drop into the casual water and then take a second drop from
there 


ANSWER 1 (of 5)
(C) Drop into the casual water and then take a second drop from
there

You must first drop the ball within one club-length of your
nearest point of relief, even though that point is in casual
water. If, after the drop, casual water interferes with your
stance or the area of your intended swing, you have the option
of playing the ball as it lies or taking a second drop away
from casual water. (The reverse is also true. If a player hits
his ball into casual water and the nearest point of relief is
on a cart path, he must drop on the cart path.)

The Rules generally do not allow for taking relief from two
conditions in one step; it must be done separately. This is
true even if the ball lies in two conditions at once, such as
casual water within ground under repair. If the player wants
to take relief in this case, he chooses to take his first drop
from either condition. After the drop, he has the option of
playing the ball as it lies (unless the first condition
interferes) or taking another drop away from the second
condition. Now What If?
	
Your tee shot comes to rest on a paved cart path. You take
relief from the path and drop in casual water next to the path.
Your nearest point of relief from casual water is back on the
path.

How should you proceed?

In addition to the options of dropping back on the path or
playing the ball as it lies, Decision 1-4/8 allows the player,
in equity, to obtain relief at the point nearest to the ball's
original position on the cart path which is no closer to the
hole, avoids interference with both the cart path and the
casual water, and is not in a hazard or on a putting green. 


QUESTION 2 (of 5)
Playing on a rainy day, you have a buried lie in a bunker when
play is suspended. You mark and lift your ball, as permitted by
Rule 6-8c. When play resumes the next day, you find that the
bunker has been prepared by the greenkeeping staff. Your ball-
marker has been moved and the indentation where your ball
originally lay has been smoothed.

How should you proceed?

a. Re-create the buried lie
b. Drop the ball outside the trap and take a one-stroke penalty
c. Drop the ball outside the trap, no penalty
d. Drop the ball in the trap and play from there 


ANSWER 2 (of 5)
(A) Re-create the buried lie

You must re-create your buried lie as nearly as possible and
place a ball in that lie. If your original lie was in a foot-
print, you would be obligated to re-create the footprint. 
However, the obligation to restore the lie is limited to what
is practical in the circumstances. A player is not required to
replace loose impediments or restore conditions such as washed-
out areas or casual water that have been eliminated by the 
greenkeeping staff.

When play is suspended, a player is not necessarily entitled to
the same lie he had prior to the discontinuance. Natural causes
such as wind, rain, and water may change the conditions where
the ball is to be replaced, for better or worse. In this case,
however, the changes were made by the greenkeeping staff, not
by nature. Now What If?

You mark and lift your ball in a bunker when play is suspended.
When play resumes the next day, the bunker has not been pre-
pared by the greenkeeping staff, but your ball-marker has been
moved by wind or water.

How should you proceed?

If the precise spot where the ball lay is determinable (i.e.,
the mark remains where the ball was buried), you place a ball
on that spot. If the spot cannot be determined, you must drop
a ball as near as possible to where the ball lay (Rule 20-3c).
If you had a good lie, the drop will probably leave you in
worse shape, but a player is not necessarily entitled to the
same lie he had. 



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QUESTION 3 (of 5)
Playing after a sudden rain shower, you hit your ball into a
bunker that is completely covered by casual water. Your ball
lies in water too deep to play a shot. You take relief by
dropping within the bunker at a point where the water is very
shallow. Your opponent says that is not allowed because a
player must take complete relief.

Who is correct?

a. You, because the ball is in a bunker
b. Your opponent, because a player must take complete relief
c. You are both incorrect 


ANSWER 3 (of 10)
(A) You, because the ball is in a bunker

Your procedure is allowed because the ball is in a bunker.
Through the green, a player taking relief from casual water
(or ground under repair) must drop at a point that avoids 
interference by the condition, both in his stance and the area
of his swing. This means he can't move to a spot where there is
less casual water. In a hazard, however, he may drop at a point
that provides "maximum available relief" (Rule 25-1b).

The reason is that when the ball is in a hazard, free relief is
allowed only if the drop is within the hazard. A drop outside
the hazard (keeping the point where the ball lay between the
hole and the drop point) incurs a one-stroke penalty. Rather
than forcing a player to take a penalty stroke in a situation
where a bunker is filled with casual water, the Rules provide
the option of taking relief where there is the least 
interference. If an area in the bunker provides complete relief
no closer to the hole, the player must drop there, because that
constitutes "maximum available relief."  Now What If?

You hit your ball into a bunker completely covered by casual
water. You take a drop in the bunker at a point that affords
maximum available relief. When dropped, the ball rolls from a
spot with about a quarter inch of casual water to a spot where
the water is about a half inch deep.

What is the ruling?

You are allowed to redrop the ball (Decision 25-1b/6). If it
rolls to deeper water again, you are allowed to place the ball
where it first struck the bunker when redropped. 


QUESTION 4 (of 5)
Your ball finishes on the green, 15 feet away from the hole.
The course is muddy from last night's rain, and so is your
ball. You lift and clean, then replace it. As you study your
putt, the ball, which is lying on a slope, rolls about five
feet closer to the hole.

Do you replace the ball to its original position or play it
from where it stopped rolling?

a. Replace the ball to its original position and take a
penalty stroke
b. Play the ball from where it stopped rolling, no penalty
c. Play the ball from where it stopped rolling and take a
penalty stroke
d. Take a penalty, then re-hit your approach 

ANSWER 4 (of 5)
(B) Play the ball from where it stopped rolling, no penalty

If the ball remained at rest for a few seconds, you play it
from where it ended up after rolling closer to the hole.
Once it is at rest, the ball is in play. Neither gravity nor
wind-the forces that might have moved the ball in this
situation-are considered outside agencies, so the ball is
not replaced. If you are lucky enough to have the ball roll
into the hole, you are considered to have holed out with your
previous stroke. However, if the ball didn't start moving
until after you addressed it, you are considered to have
caused it to move, are penalized one stroke, and must replace
the ball.

In the original situation, you must replace the ball if it
was not at rest before it started rolling down the slope.
Decision 20-3d/1 includes the "few seconds" requirement in
order to be certain the ball was not moving. If you are
unable to put the ball back on the green so that it stays at
rest, you place it at the nearest spot not nearer the hole 
where it can be placed at rest.  Now What If?

After your second shot, an approach to a par four, your ball
is overhanging the lip of the hole. There is mud on the ball,
so you mark it, clean it, and replace it. The ball remains
on the lip of the hole for a few seconds, then falls into
the hole.

What is the ruling?

You make a three on the hole. Rule 16-2 specifically covers
the situation of a ball overhanging the hole. If a ball
falls into the hole after being deemed to be at rest 
overhanging the lip, the player is considered to have holed
out with his previous stroke, but he also must add a penalty
stroke. In this case, the ball must be considered to have 
been at rest when it was re-placed, otherwise it would have
to be replaced again (Rule 20-3d).



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QUESTION 5 (of 5)
Playing in a downpour, you hit your tee shot into the fairway,
but it ends up in a large puddle of casual water. You can see
a ball toward the middle of the puddle, but you can't 
retrieve or identify it as yours without sloshing through some
ankle-deep water.

Are you allowed to take relief?

a. Yes, but with a penalty stroke
b. Yes, without a penalty stroke
c. No, you must hit from where it lies 

ANSWER 5 (of 10)
(B) Yes, without a penalty stroke

A player is not obliged to use unreasonable effort to retrieve
and identify a ball he sees in casual water, so long as there
is reasonable evidence that his ball is in the casual water.
Examples of sufficient evidence would be seeing the ball go
into the water or the fact that the ball could easily be found
if it were in the area near the casual water.

A different reference point for the drop is used if the ball is
found or if it is lost in casual water (Rule 25-1). If the ball
is found, the player determines the nearest point of relief
relative to the position of the ball, and drops within one
club-length of that point. If the ball is lost, he uses the
spot the ball last entered the casual water as his reference
point. So, if a player can retrieve his ball from casual water
without unreasonable effort, he must do so.  Now What If?
	
You hit your tee shot into the rough in an area you can't see
from the tee. It turns out there is a large puddle of casual
water in that area. You can see a ball toward the middle of
the puddle, but it would be difficult to retrieve.

Are you allowed to take relief from casual water?

You are not allowed relief from casual water without
identifying the ball as yours because there is not reasonable
evidence that the ball is in the casual water; it might be lost
in the nearby rough. In this case, you probably will want to
get your feet wet to retrieve the ball to see if it is yours;
otherwise, you will have to take a stroke-and-distance penalty
for a lost ball.


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            *** THE WORLD ACCORDING TO TZ *** 

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