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Publication: Diabetes Update
Glucose Monitoring the Modern Way

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Diabetic Digest - Wednesday, June 4, 2008
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News, updates and help from and for the diabetic community.
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Readers:

Today's issue is filled with information on diabetics 
health risks, Insulin Pumps, delicious recipes and a 
video clip on the monitor of glucose levels. I hope that 
today's issue of the Diabetic Digest helps you to find 
ways to improve your health. 

Here's a link to a very informative video clip concerning 
Glucose Monitoring.

Click to View: Health Tip: Glucose Monitoring the Modern Way

Have a healthy week. 

Regards,
Steve

Diabetic Update Newsletter
Send Your Comments

Visit the Diabetic Update Forum and post your comments at: 
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Diabetes Death Risk Higher in Young Adults

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Relative to their peers without
type 1 diabetes, patients who are diagnosed with the
disease in young adulthood are at greater risk for death
than those diagnosed in childhood, according to a report
in the journal Diabetes Care.

Dr. Richard G. Feltbower, of the University of Leeds, UK,
and colleagues examined death rates and causes of death
among patients with type 1 diabetes entered in a database
in Yorkshire, UK, between 1978 and 2004. The subjects, who
were all under 30 years of age, were then linked with the
UK National Health Service Central Register for death
notifications.

A total of 4246 patients were included in the study. Of
these patients, 3349 were diagnosed between the ages of
0 and 14 years and 897 were diagnosed between the ages of
15 and 29 years. The younger group was followed for an
average of 12.8 years, and the older group was followed
for an average of 8.3 years.

During the course of the study,108 patients died, including
74 in the younger group and 34 in the older group.

Overall, the diabetics in the study were 4.7-times more
likely to die during follow-up than similar-aged
individuals drawn from the general population.

The relative death risk, however, differed for younger and
older diabetic patients. In individuals between 15 and 29
years of age, diabetes increased the risk of death by 6.2-
fold, whereas in younger people, the disease raised the
risk by 4.2-fold.

The risk of death increased with increasing disease
duration, the report indicates.

Of the 108 deaths, 47 resulted from diabetes complications.
Twenty-four deaths were related to accidents or violence,
including six suicides.

In addition, 17 deaths were attributed to drug abuse,
which included insulin overdoses, as well as overdoses
with other drugs, mainly with opiates.

"These are important new findings for (doctors) treating
young people with type 1 diabetes, as we have identified
a propensity for young-adult subjects to misuse drugs or
take insulin overdoses," Feltbower's team concludes.

SOURCE: Diabetes Care, May 2008.

Copyright 2006 Reuters Limited. All rights reserved.

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Mild Insulin Pump-related Skin Problems Common

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Many children and teens using 
insulin pumps to control type 1 diabetes experience skin 
problems at the infusion catheter insertion site, but few 
report thinking about stopping insulin pump therapy because 
of these problems. 

Insulin pump therapy has several advantages over insulin 
shots, including better control of glucose (sugar) 
metabolism, Dr. Louise S. Conwell and colleagues from the 
Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto and colleagues note 
in The Journal of Pediatrics this month. 

Over the years, studies have suggested that both injections 
and insulin pumps may cause dermatologic problems, they 
add. In the early days of insulin pump therapy, many 
patients developed infection and inflammation at the 
catheter site, but no study has looked at these 
complications in patients using modern pumps and rapid-
acting insulin-like drugs. 

Therefore, Conwell and colleagues surveyed 50 patients 
with type 1 diabetes who had used insulin pumps for longer 
than 6 months. 

The vast majority (94 percent) reported scars smaller than 
3 millimeters in diameter, two-thirds had swelling, just 
under two-thirds had lesions under the skin, and 42 percent 
had fat lumps under the skin. 

The thinner the patient, the more likely he or she was to 
have dermatologic complications of insulin pump use, the
researchers report, but there was no relationship between 
long-term blood sugar control and risk of skin problems.

Just 4 percent of parents and 2.4 percent of patients said 
they considered stopping insulin pump therapy because of 
related skin problems. 

SOURCE: The Journal of Pediatrics, May 2008.

Copyright 2006 Reuters Limited. All rights reserved.

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                     Diabetic Recipe

                    Turkey Minestrone

                   (makes 4 servings)

1/2 tablespoon (7.5 ml) olive oil

1 medium onion, chopped

1 clove garlic, minced

6 cups (1.4 l) 98% fat-free, no-salt-added canned chicken 
broth

1 medium red skinned potato, scrubbed and diced

1/4 cup (49 g) dried split peas

1/2 teaspoon (2.5 ml) crushed dried basil

1/2 teaspoon (2.5 ml) crushed dried thyme

1 small bay leaf

1 medium zucchini, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 large ripe plum tomato, seeded and diced

1 15-ounce (450 g) cannellini beans, rinsed and drained

1 cup (140 g) chopped cooked turkey meat or chicken breast

1/4 cup chopped (15 g) flat-leaf parsley (optional)

2 tablespoons (10 g) freshly grated Parmesan cheese (optional)

1. In a large pot, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion and 
   garlic. Sauté until onion is wilted, about 5 minutes. 
   Stir in chicken broth.

2. Raise heat and add potato, split peas, basil, thyme, and 
   bay leaf. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, 
   uncovered, for 30 minutes. 

3. Remove bay leaf. Stir in zucchini, tomato, cannellini 
   beans, and turkey. Simmer, uncovered, another 15 
   minutes, stirring occasionally. 

4. Ladle into soup bowl. If using, sprinkle each serving 
   with parsley and then some of the grated cheese. Serve 
   hot. 

Per serving: 226 calories (16% calories from fat), 
             20 g protein, 4 g total fat (0.9 g saturated 
             fat), 26 g carbohydrates, 7 g dietary fiber, 
             27 mg cholesterol, 253 mg sodium 

Diabetic exchanges: 2 very lean protein, 2 carbohydrate 
                    (1 1/2 bread/starch, 1 vegetable)

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Copyright 2008 by NextEra Media. All rights reserved.

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